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Exotic Chiles of Oaxaca and Mexico

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Chiles

As a teenager in Texas, I liked to skip school and explore the countryside looking for arrowheads. One time I was on a bluff and I found 5 or 6 "corn grinders." I went below the bluff to where there was a small overhang and found, to my disbelief, a chile plant growing. It was a special moment for me, a direct contact with the native Americans who had once populated south Texas.

chiles secos

Chiles (Capsicum spp.) are also called chili peppers in English and both chile and chili are correct spellings. In Spanish it is just chile and in Nahuatl, the chile is known as chili.[1] The chile plant originates from Mexico from the region of "southern Puebla and northern Oaxaca to southeastern Veracruz."[2] Capsicum annuum, which includes jalapeños, has been found in the Tehuacan Valley that has been dated to around 4000 BCE.[3] Another source states that capsicum annuum have been domesticated and cultivated before 6000 BCE.[4] The image to the right or above is of chiles secos or dried chiles. Click here for a larger image of dried chiles.

Chiles, fresh and dried, are frequently used as a spice in Mexican cooking. Chiles contain capsaicinoids which are responsible for the burning sensation of the spice. The Scoville heat unit (SHU) rating is a measurement of the spicy heat of chile peppers. Habenero is probably the hottest chile you will find in a Oaxacan market.

Peppers and chiles are major export crops for Mexico; peppers are the largest agriculture export crop and chiles are Mexico's third largest agriculture export with a value of 985 million dollars.[4a]

Bell Peppers

Bell Peppers

Bell Peppers are known as pimientos morrón in Spanish. Bell peppers come in a variety of different colors, including chocolate-brown, red, yellow, orange, green, white, ivory and purple, but in Mexico count on seeing them in green, orange, yellow and red. Bell peppers are rated at 100 - 500 on the Scoville scale.[5] For a larger image of pimiento morrón, click here.

Some people get sick from eating green bell peppers. Typically, green bell peppers are not ripe and red ones are ripe, with yellow and orange ones in between. (Some types of green bell peppers remain green when ripe.) Unripe green bell peppers have a more bitter flavor and contain solanine which some people are more sensitive to than others.[6][7]

Chile árbol and chile árbol seco

Chiles árboles are rated at 32,000 on the Scoville scale. Click here for a larger image of chiles árboles. Click here for a larger image of chiles árboles secos.

Chiles costeños secos

chiles costenos secos

Chiles costeños secos. Click here for a larger image of chiles costeños.

Chiles de agua

chiles de agua

Chiles de agua. A popular chile from Oaxaca and among Oaxacans in particular. Oddly, chiles de agua are sold by the piece and not by the weight as other chiles are. Click here for a larger image of chiles de agua.

Chile guajillo

Chiles guajillos

Chile mirasol is dried to make chile guajillo. Click here for a larger image of chile guajillo.

Chiles güeros

chile güeros

Chiles güeros are also known as chiles guetos and look a lot like chiles de agua but they are a little longer, wider and lighter in color than chiles de agua. Chiles güeros are rated at 700 on the Scoville scale.[8] I have stuffed them with spiced ground beef, topped with a tomatoes sauce and then baked them until done, tastes great. Click here for a larger image of chiles güeros. Dried chiles güeros are known as chilhuacle negro, rojo or amarillo.

Chiles habaneros

chiles habaneros

Chiles habaneros are, I think, the hottest chile you will find in most Mexican markets. Chiles habaneros are rated at 100,000 a 350,000 on the Scoville scale.[9] Click here for a larger image of chiles habaneros.

Chile Manzano

Chile Manzano is rated at 22,000 on the Scoville scale. Chile manzanos are dried out to make chile cascabel. Cascabel is the Spanish word for rattle in English. When you shake a dried chile cascabel it makes a rattling sound. Click here for larger image of chile manzanos and here for a larger image of chile cascabel.

Chiles pasillas

Chile chilacas are dried out to make chiles pasillas, which are my favorite type of dried chiles. There are two types of chiles pasillas, chiles pasillas (sometimes called chiles negras) and chiles pasillas oaxacaños which are dark red. Click here for a larger image of chiles pasillas and click here for a larger image of chiles pasillas oaxacaños.

Chile piquín

chile piquin

Chile piquín are rated at 32,000 on the Scoville scale.[10] Click here for a larger image of chile piquín.

Chiles poblanos

Chiles poblanos are rated at 18,000 on the Scoville scale.[11] Click here for a larger image of chiles poblanos. Dried chiles poblanos are called chiles anchos. Click here for a larger image of chiles anchos.

Chiles serranos

chiles serranos

Chiles serranos also known as chiles verdes are perhaps the most utilized chile in Mexico. Chiles serranos are rated at 40,000 on the Scoville scale.[12] Click here for a larger image of chiles serranos. Dried chiles serranos are called chiltepe or chiles serranos secos.

Chiles tustas

chiles tustas

Chiles tustas are a popular chile of coastal Oaxaca. Click here for a larger image of chiles tustas.

Chiles verdes, see Chiles serranos.

Jalapeños

Jalapeños are rated at 24,000 on the Scoville scale.[13] Dried jalapeños that have been smoked are called chile morita and chipotle. Chile morita are smoked for less time than chipotle leaving chile morita softer and with a fruitier flavor. Click here for a larger image of jalapeños and here for chipotle.

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Footnotes and Notes

  1. 1. Chile. Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Spanish. Retrieved March 2018.
  2. 2. University of California, Davis. 21 April 2014. Birthplace of the domesticated chili pepper identified in Mexico . EurekAlert! The Global Source for Science News. Retrieved March 2018.
  3. 3. Perry, Linda & Dickau, Ruth & Zarrillo, Sonia & Holst, Irene & Pearsall, Deborah & Piperno, D.R. & Berman, Mary Jane & Cooke, Richard & Rademaker, Kurt & Ranere, Anthony & Scott Raymond, J & Sandweiss, Daniel & Scaramelli, Franz & Tarble de Scaramelli, Kay & Zeidler, James. 2007. Starch Fossils and the Domestication and Dispersal of Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) in the Americas. Science (New York, N.Y.). 315. 986-8. 10.1126/science.1136914.
  4. 4. Chile. Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Spanish. Retrieved March 2018.
  5. 4a. Rise in Demand for Chili Could Boost Mexican Exports. El Universal, Mexico. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  6. 5. Chile. Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Spanish. Retrieved March 2018.
  7. 6. Elliot, Jennifer. Oct. 27, 2016. Does Bell Pepper Cause Stomach Cramps?. Fitnessrepublic.com. Retrieved March 2018.
  8. 7. According to wikipedia, "Solanine is a glycoalkaloid poison found in species of the nightshade family within the genus Solanum, such as the potato (Solanum tuberosum), the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the eggplant (Solanum melongena). It can occur naturally in any part of the plant, including the leaves, fruit, and tubers. Solanine has pesticidal properties, and it is one of the plant's natural defenses." Solanine. Wikipedia.com. Retrieved March 2018.
  9. 8. Chile. Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Spanish. Retrieved March 2018.
  10. 9. Ibid.
  11. 10. Ibid.
  12. 11. Ibid.
  13. 12. Ibid.
  14. 13. Ibid.
  15. An informative article on how the Scoville Scale rates the relative spiciness of a chile peppers: Greenaway, Twilight. January 10, 2013. "How Hot is That Pepper? How Scientists Measure Spiciness". Smithsonian.com. Retrieved March 20, 2018.

Photo Credits

Photos taken by Marc Wilkinson. I, the copyright holder, hereby publish these photos under the following license: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0).